Stomatal frequency adjustment to historical changes in atmospheric CO2

 

 

Stomatal frequency adjustment of four conifer species to historical changes in atmospheric CO2

by Kouwenberg L. L. R., McElwain J. C., Kürschner W. M., Wagner F., Beerling D. J., Mayle F. E., Visscher H. (2003)

Lenny L. R. Kouwenberg, Laboratory of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Utrecht University, 3584 CD Utrecht, Netherlands;

Jennifer_Mcelwain
Jennifer C. McElwain, Department of Geology, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60605 USA;
Wolfram_Kuerschner
Wolfram M. Kürschner, Laboratory of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Utrecht University, 3584 CD Utrecht, Netherlands;

Friederike Wagner, Laboratory of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Utrecht University, 3584 CD Utrecht, Netherlands;

davebeerling
David J. Beerling, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN UK;
FrankMayle_w
Francis E. Mayle, Department of Geography, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH UK
Henk_Visscher3
Henk Visscher, Laboratory of Palaeobotany and Palynology, Utrecht University, 3584 CD Utrecht, Netherlands;

 

 
 

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in American Journal of Botany 90(4): 610-619 – doi: 10.3732/ajb.90.4.610 – 

http://www.amjbot.org/content/90/4/610.abstract

ABSTRACT

The species-specific inverse relation between atmospheric CO2 concentration and stomatal frequency for many woody angiosperm species is being used increasingly with fossil leaves to reconstruct past atmospheric CO2 levels. To extend our limited knowledge of the responsiveness of conifer needles to CO2 fluctuations, the stomatal frequency response of four native North American conifer species (Tsuga heterophyllaPicea glaucaPicea mariana, and Larix laricina) to a range of historical CO2 mixing ratios (290 to 370 ppmV) was analyzed.

Because of the specific mode of leaf development and the subsequent stomatal patterning in conifer needles, the stomatal index of these species was not affected by CO2.

In contrast, a new measure of stomatal frequency, based on the number of stomata per millimeter of needle length, decreased significantly with increasing CO2. For Tsuga heterophylla, the stomatal frequency response to CO2 changes in the last century is validated through assessment of the influence of other biological and environmental variables.

Because of their sensitive response to CO2, combined with a high preservation capacity, fossil needles of Tsuga heterophyllaPicea glaucaP. mariana, and Larix laricina have great potential for detecting and quantifying past atmospheric CO2 fluctuations.

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Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.

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