The pattern of cellulose crystallinity in stomata of floating plants

 

 

Permanently open stomata of aquatic Angiosperms display modified cellulose crystallinity patterns

by Shtein I., Popper Z., Harpa-Saad S. (2017)

Ilana_Shtein
Ilana Shtein, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev , Beer Sheva 84105 , Israel.
Zoe_Popper
Zoe Popper, National University of Ireland Galway , Galway , Ireland.
Smadar_Harpaz-Saad
Smadar Harpaz-Saad, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem , Rehovot 7610001 , Israel
1
a Department of Mechanical Engineering , Ben-Gurion University of the Negev , Beer Sheva 84105 , Israel.
2
b Botany and Plant Science, Ryan Institute for Environmental, Marine and Energy Research, School of Natural Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway , Galway , Ireland.
3
c The Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem , Rehovot 7610001 , Israel.

in Plant signaling & behavior · July 2017 – DOI: 10.1080/15592324.2017.1339858 – 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28718691

Abstract

Most floating aquatic plants have stomata on their upper leaf surfaces, and usually their stomata are permanently open.

We previously identified three distinct crystallinity patterns in stomatal cell walls, with angiosperm kidney-shaped stomata having the highest crystallinity in the polar end walls as well as the adjacent polar regions of the guard cells.

A numerical bio-mechanical model suggested that the high crystallinity areas are localized to regions where the highest stress is imposed. Here, stomatal cell wall crystallinity was examined in four floating plants from two different taxa: basal angiosperms from the ANITA grade and monocots.

It appears that the non-functional stomata of floating plants display reduced crystallinity in the polar regions as compared to high crystallinity of the ventral (inner) walls. Thus their guard cells are both less flexible and less stress resistant.

Our findings suggest that the pattern of cellulose crystallinity in stomata of floating plants from different families was altered as a consequence of similar evolutionary pressures.

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Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.

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