iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics, MeJA and stomata

Photo credit: PUBS-ACS

 

Methyl jasmonate responsive proteins in Brassica napus guard cells revealed by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics.

by Zhu M., Dai S., Zhu N., Booy A., Simons B., Yi S.,Chen S. (2012)

 Department of Biology, Genetics Institute, and Plant Molecular & Cellular Biology Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, United States
 Alkali Soil Natural Environmental Science Center, Northeast Forestry University, Key Laboratory of Saline-alkali Vegetation Ecology Restoration in Oil Field, Ministry of Education, Harbin 150040, China
§ MDS Analytical Technologies (SCIEX), Ontario, Canada L4K 4V8
 Proteomics Division, Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610, United States

 

in J. Proteome Res. 11, 3728–3742. – doi: 10.1021/pr300213k –

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr300213k

Synopsis

Stomata on leaf epidermis formed by pairs of guard cells control gas exchange and water transpiration. Stress-induced stomatal closure is mediated via an intricate hormone network in guard cells.

Here we report the effects of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) on Brassica napus stomatal movement and H2O2 production. Eighty-four MeJA-responsive proteins in B. napus guard cells were identified using an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) approach.

This has improved our understanding of MeJA-resposive molecular mechanisms in guard cells, which include homeostasis of H2O2 production and scavenging, signaling through cytoplasmic calcium oscillation and protein (de)phosphorylation, gene transcription, protein modification, energy balance, osmoregulation, and cell shape modulation.

Abstract

Stomata on leaf epidermis formed by pairs of guard cells control CO2 intake and water transpiration, and respond to different environmental conditions. Stress-induced stomatal closure is mediated via an intricate hormone network in guard cells.

Although methyl jasmonate (MeJA) has been intensively studied for its function in plant defense, the molecular mechanisms underlying its function in stomatal movement are not fully understood.

Here we report the effects of MeJA on Brassica napus stomatal movement and H2O2 production. Using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) approach, we have identified 84 MeJA-responsive proteins in B. napus guard cells. Most of the genes encoding these proteins contain jasmonate-responsive elements in the promoters, indicating that they are potentially regulated at the transcriptional level.

Among the identified proteins, five protein changes after MeJA treatment were validated using Western blot analysis. The identification of the MeJA-responsive proteins has revealed interesting molecular mechanisms underlying MeJA function in guard cells, which include homeostasis of H2O2 production and scavenging, signaling through calcium oscillation and protein (de)phosphorylation, gene transcription, protein modification, energy balance, osmoregulation, and cell shape modulation.

The knowledge of the MeJA-responsive proteins has improved our understanding of MeJA signaling in stomatal movement, and it may be applied to crop engineering for enhanced yield and stress tolerance.

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Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.

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