Stomata in Gomphrena (Amaranthaceae)

Photo credit: Scielo

Leaf epidermis and stomata under scanning electron microscopy. 3A: G. virgata adaxial epidermis with striae also over the secondary order vein (white arrow) and fungi hyphae (arrow head). 3B: G. arborescens stoma and epicuticular wax (black arrow). 3C: G. pohlii stoma. 3D: G. virgata stoma. 3E: G. globosa stoma.

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Gomphrena

Leaf surfaces of Gomphrena spp. (Amaranthaceae) from Cerrado biome

by Fank-de-Carvalho S. M., Rodrigues de Aguiar Gomes M., Tanno Silva P. I., Nair Báo S. (2010)

Suzane Margaret Fank-de-Carvalho, Misléia Rodrigues de Aguiar Gomes, Pedro Ítalo Tanno Silva, Sônia Nair Báo

Departamento de Biologia Celular, Laboratório de Microscopia Eletrônica, Universidade de Brasília, Campus Universitário Darcy Ribeiro, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. CEP 70919-970, Brasília/DF, Brasil.

in Biocell vol.34 no.1 Mendoza ene./abr. 2010

http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/biocell/vol/pdf/34_1/04.pdf

ABSTRACT:

The leaf structure and micromorphology characterize plant species and reflex its interactions with the environment. Leaf epidermis sculptures aid high transpiration plants on light reflection. The form and distribution of epicuticular wax crystalloids are important to characterize the surface.

Leaf epidermal surfaces under optical microscope. 2A: Abaxial surface of G. globosa leaf. 2B: Abaxial surface of G. arborescens leaf. 2C: Abaxial surface of G. pohlii leaf. 2D: Abaxial surface of G. virgata leaf. - http://www.scielo.org.ar/img/revistas/biocell/v34n1/a04f2.gif
Leaf epidermal surfaces under optical microscope. 2A: Abaxial surface of G. globosa leaf. 2B: Abaxial surface of G. arborescens leaf. 2C: Abaxial surface of G. pohlii leaf. 2D: Abaxial surface of G. virgata leaf. – http://www.scielo.org.ar/img/revistas/biocell/v34n1/a04f2.gif

 

Aiming to know the micromorphology and the ultrastructure of G. arborescens,G. pohlii and G. virgata, leaves of these Cerrado native species were collected in Brasília, Distrito Federal, Brazil, at the Olympic Center of the Universidade de Brasília and at Reserva Ecológica do Roncador. Leaves of G. globosa, an Indian native species, were also studied for comparison.

Leaves were fractionated, fixed and treated for observation under optical and scanning electron microscope. A description of the leaf epidermis is provided, along with some quantitative data to help the species taxonomy and support future studies on their physiology: all species are amphistomatic and have Stomatal Index between 7.27 and 18.99.

The Gomphrena spp. studied have epicuticular wax platelets and wax sculptures over their larger trichome, which are relevant for their taxonomy. Over the Cerrado species cuticle, epicuticular wax is damaged by fungi hyphae development. The presence of epicuticular wax on Gomphrena spp. leaves corroborates the phylogenetical alliance between Amaranthaceae and Chenopodiaceae.

Read the full article: Scielo

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Published by

Willem Van Cotthem

Honorary Professor of Botany, University of Ghent (Belgium). Scientific Consultant for Desertification and Sustainable Development.